Police Station and Municipal Court Planning

The City Council is in the process of working with the community to develop a plan to replace our current police station and municipal court.

The Bainbridge Island City Council voted on Tuesday, May 2, 2017 to move forward with investigating the New Brooklyn site. This decision came after reviewing the Coates Design Analysis of the six potential sites and hearing public comments from the Open House held on April 12.

Unfortunately, the New Brooklyn site is no longer available for acquisition; therefore, the City is moving forward with investigating the Yaquina Avenue site.

In November 2017, the City was presented an offer from CHI Franciscan to consider the Harrison Bainbridge Medical Clinic as a potential site for the police and court facility.

On March 6, 2018, the City Council was presented with an analysis and planning cost estimates for both the Yaquina site and the Harrison Bainbridge site.  The presentation link is provided in the sidebar of this project page.

9657 NE YAQUINA AVE
Site is located adjacent to SR305 and access is available from Madison Avenue N, which is a controlled intersection.

HARRISON BAINBRIDGE
Site is located adjacent to SR305 and access is available from Madison Avenue N. at the intersection with New Brooklyn.

EXISTING SITE
In 2006, the Webber Study took a much closer look at the existing Police Station site. In fact, the purpose of the study was to determine if it is, in fact, feasible to develop a facility that accommodates the program. Although the 2006 program included a combined Municipal Court/Police facility, a police only facility will still face many of the same challenges (see Webber Study), including:

  • Access to the site is difficult. The police operations and employee ingress and egress is located on Olympic Drive. The traffic design as it is shown in the site layout is not a good design and will likely be revised by the engineers or require expensive street-work such as additional left-turn lanes or other traffic mitigations.
  • Development of off-site parking may require construction of new parking lots and underground stormwater detention on private property. It is not known whether the adjacent property owners would be cooperative. Underground stormwater detention is expensive.
  • As an urban site, the stormwater detention on the site would need to be underground. A larger, suburban site could accommodate stormwater detention with a pond, rather than a tank, which is much less expensive.
  • Underground parking and building areas would need to be built. Underground parking is much more costly than surface parking. Additionally, the cost of the building with underground parking is much more expensive than building at-grade.
  • The site requires a multi-story building. Because of the security separations, the building will require separate, redundant, vertical circulation systems that would not be required in a building that is built at-grade.
  • The police operations in the secure parking area are not optimal. The sally-port is a single-entrance sally-port. By definition, and for operations purposes, a sally-port should be designed so that cars enter the sally-port and drive forward through a second door to exit.
  • There is no room on the site for any "public benefit" features.

Council had previously considered four other sites including a site at 600 Erickson Avenue, but after further analysis, the site is no longer under consideration. In 1997, Miller/Hull Partnership conducted an analysis of the existing 600 Erickson Avenue building to determine its suitability to serve as a new City Hall. The analysis concluded that the building was in very good condition and high quality for a commercial office building, but would require significant structural enhancements to meet essential facility requirements.

For a history of the decision-making process on this project please visit the Police facility background page.

Why Does the Current Police Station Need to be Replaced?

In 2014, the City contracted with the Mackenzie firm to conduct a study of the current police and court facilities and analyze potential options for replacement. The study found that the current facility is undersized and outdated for effective, modern law enforcement. There are numerous deficiencies (PDF), listed in the report below is a small sample:

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  1. Structural and Site deficiencies: Unreinforced masonry buildings like this one have proven to perform very poorly during seismic events. Additionally, the current site lacks sufficient space, has areas that are cramped and difficult to access, has unsecured parking, and has loose wiring for electricity and telecommunications that rests on the rooftop and is easily subject to tampering or damage from adjacent trees.
  2. Evidence Storage: The evidence technician's desk is located within the evidence storage room, exposing the employee to constant interaction with potentially dangerous substances.
  3. Records Archives: The archives room was the subject of a prior sewage leak, thankfully compromising only one bin of documents. The storage space is currently filled to capacity.
  4. Interview Rooms: The interview rooms lack the proper technology to effectively record meetings and provide security and privacy for the police, victims, and suspects.
  5. Toilet Room: Neither of the two restrooms are fully ADA compliant, one meets the spatial requirements, though it lacks the vertical grab bar necessary. Both are accessed through the public lobby and pose a security risk to officers and staff.

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The City of Bainbridge Island fully complies with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and related statues in all programs and activities.  Those requiring disability accommodations, please contact the City Clerk at 206-842-2545 or email.